1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend. Hugh Montgomery.
1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend
1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend
1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend
1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend
1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend
1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend
1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend

1820-1829 copy book of letters detailing support for an orphaned child from the deceased father's good friend

8vo, marbled boards, book itself rubbed and used, with 38 pages filled in, from 1821-29, detailing Hugh Montgomery's efforts to support the education of Horatio (Trafalgar) Beck (1807-1880s). Montgomery lived at Levington Cottage near Ipswich. He refers to the boy's father as his deceased "messmate," and given the boy's name, named after Horatio Nelson's famous 1805 triumph, we can well imagine that the elder Beck and Montgomery must have been in the Navy together under Nelson. After Beck died, Montgomery took it on himself to provide financial assistance for young Horatio's education, and contacted the boy's uncle, John Beck -- much of the copy book is taken up with establishing Horatio in school and providing John Beck an annual 5-10 Pounds to support Horatio's prospects and the furtherance of his studies. In short time, financial hardship and ill health beset Hugh Montgomery, and it was a struggle for him to meet the obligations he's set for himself, and (querulously) he expresses the hope, rather often, that Horatio is worth all this effort. He is also "vexed" that Horatio's mother has not done anything to support her own child. Toward the end of this copy book, the letters turn toward Horatio's future, and there is an account of a visit from the mother, who thinks that Horatio should engage in a career at sea, which is what his father wanted for him. Montgomery makes inquires about placing Horatio on a ship engaged in trade with the Indies, thinking a long voyage would be a good way to commence his learning. The letters end abruptly in 1829, with Horatio's prospects still unclear. From research on genealogical sites, we have found that Horatio lived a long wife, married, had at least three children and that his occupation, at least in later years was listed as "joiner." Good. Item #H8611

Price: $200.00

See all items in British History
See all items by