"Killer Surrenders" -- 3 original photos from 1956 mounted to 16 x 20" sheet showing the surrender of killer Charles Lutsovich. John L. Alexandrowicz.
"Killer Surrenders" -- 3 original photos from 1956 mounted to 16 x 20" sheet showing the surrender of killer Charles Lutsovich
"Killer Surrenders" -- 3 original photos from 1956 mounted to 16 x 20" sheet showing the surrender of killer Charles Lutsovich
"Killer Surrenders" -- 3 original photos from 1956 mounted to 16 x 20" sheet showing the surrender of killer Charles Lutsovich

"Killer Surrenders" -- 3 original photos from 1956 mounted to 16 x 20" sheet showing the surrender of killer Charles Lutsovich

Pittsburgh: 1956. 3 photos, the largest 10 x 12" documenting the capture and surrender of Charles Lutsovich, who had killed his mother and sister and was hiding out in a cave on a farm in West Newton. Verso has photographer's name stamp, information, and label from the UMO 1956 photo journalism exhibit. Text from the Sun Telegraph: "It was the farmer, Charles Shoaf, who suggested to the troopers that Charles might be hiding in a cave on a nearby farm. Shoaf said Charles often went there. Shoaf led the troopers to the cave, in a district known as Elm Rock. The troopers had to climb a steep hillside to get to the narrow crevice In the rocks. The troopers were heavily armed. They didn't know if Charles would elect to shoot it out. They knew their man well. They knew he had been awarded an "expert" rating for rifle marksmanship, when he trained for overseas service In World War II. And they knew that, prior to war aervice, Charles had been a brilliant, straight "A" student in Sewickley Township." In the Post-Gazette, the family doctor, Dr. Toth, was interviewed. "Charles was belligerent, particularly with his own family, and had to have his own way. At various times, he threatened members of his family, the doctor said. Charles spent much of his time alone, either in the woods or in the cellar of the family home, Dr. Toth said. "It all seems to date from his discnarge from the Army," the doctor added. He served during World War II. However, Charles wouldn't talk about his Army service," the doctor added. Dr. Toth said Charles had worked only about three months in more than five years." Alexandrowicz (1927-1984) was a Pittsburgh-based photographer known both for his photo-journalism and his fine art photography; in the 1970s and 1980s he also worked for the EPA documenting industry's effects on the ecology of western Pennsylvania. An excerpt from the 1984 obituary in the Post-Gazette: "In 1973, Donald Miller, Post-Gazette art critic, reviewing a showing of Mr. Alexandrowicz's color photographs, described him as 'a visual poet, alive to compositional line, keen on moody landscapes, seascapes, exotic people and places.' At that time Mr. Alexandrowicz's giant prints were shown at three Downtown locations. Another Post-Gazette art critic, the late Jeannette Jena, once described Mr. Alexandrowicz as 'a gifted photographer whose work has a feeling for light and shade that suggests the chiaroscuro of 17th Century painting.' A native of Erie, Mr. Alexandrowicz began his career on the Erie Dispatch and joined the Sun-Telegraph in 1952. He remained there until 1961, when he joined the Post-Gazette, which had taken over the Sun-Telegraph. He started his own photography business on the Northside, and as a free-lance photographer received commissions from Western Pennsylvania industries. - His awards included the annual Kent State University photography contest, the Popular Photography Magazine contest and the Associated Press Newsphoto contest. He was Pittsburgh photographer for the New York Times and was a member of the Press Photographers Association of Greater Pittsburgh, the National Press Photographers Association, the Allegheny (North-side) Chamber of Commerce, the Polish Arts League, the Polish National Alliance, Polish Falcons and the Ethnic Cultural Heritage Organization." Very Good. Item #H15052

Price: $95.00

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