Renée Mauperin -- with tipped in letter from Edmond de Goncourt. Edmond et Jules de Goncourt.
Renée Mauperin -- with tipped in letter from Edmond de Goncourt
Renée Mauperin -- with tipped in letter from Edmond de Goncourt
Renée Mauperin -- with tipped in letter from Edmond de Goncourt
Renée Mauperin -- with tipped in letter from Edmond de Goncourt

Renée Mauperin -- with tipped in letter from Edmond de Goncourt

Paris: Charpentier, 1864. First printing. Hardcover. First ordinary edition, 8vo, half red morocco, raised bands, stamped in gilt on spine, very good. With bookplates of Charles Jolly-Bavoillot (1821-1895), an American book collector who specialized in the French Romantics; this is No. 429 in the 1896 auction catalogue of his collection, and another bookplate of Swedish collector Anders Ollfors (an expert in Strindberg). With letter from Edmond de Goncourt tipped on after the title page: ""Je vous autorise à retirer de chez Mm Salmon mon ex libris et d'en faire le tirage comme vous l'entendrez. Tout à vous, Edmond de Goncourt ... Pardonnez moi de n'avoir pas répondu à votre première lettre, j'étais au lit avec une flusion de poitrine qui m a laissé bien faible à l heure qu il est. " ("I authorize you to withdraw my ex libris from Mm Salmon and print it as you wish. All yours, Edmond de Goncourt ... Forgive me for not having replied to your first letter, I was in bed with a flusion in my chest that left me weak.") Dated 1875, this letter references the printmaker Salmon, who engraved portraits of the Goncourt brothers and did other work for them, including, apparently, Edmond de Goncourt's bookplate; and in this letter he appears to be handing the work of engraving his bookplate to a rival of Msr. Salmon. From an Amazon review of this book: "A modern girl, trained to be an artist and educator, Renee Mauperin is in many respects emancipated woman, yet she resents the restrictions on her freedom and seeks to shake off the yoke of rigid propriety. She doesn't feel this way because of the anarchist politics of the time, but rather because of her passionate and impetuous nature. Renee's brother Henri, an ambitious and calculating young bourgeois, is devious enough to hide his egotism and his ardent desire to become a man of means in the world. This facade succeeds wonderfully and causes the admiration of the good society he frequents with such diligence. Wanting to break into the business world, he seeks to marry the daughter of Bourjot, a successful nouveau-riche sort. To achieve his ends, Henry seduces the mother and becomes her lover. Then threatening to expose the scandal, he demands the Bourjots grant him the hand of their daughter and the millions of the dowry. But Bourjot, whom fortune has converted into a monarchist and a supporter of nobility, asserts that he will accept as a son-in-law only an aristocrat. Henri protests and then sets to work to become an "aristocrat" by stealing someone else's title. Renee, shocked by the baseness of her brother and apprised of the sordid blackmail he had exerted on Madame Bourjot, warns the legitimate bearer of the title Henri had "borrowed." This results in a duel where Henri is killed. Overwhelmed with grief, tortured by remorse, Renee lets herself die in long suffering in order to atone for her intercession." The name of the heroine would have reminded readers of Theophile Gautier's erotic novel "Mademoiselle de Maupin" from 1835 (Gautier was still alive; the brothers dedicated the book to him) and of Camille Maupin, the unforgettable character in Balzac's novel "Beatrix" from 1839. A similar copy (inscribed and with a letter) was offered by Bassenge Auction in 2013 with an estimate of 1800 Euros but did not meet reserve. Very Good. Item #H16274

Price: $1,000.00

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