Pilgrim's Progress - recovered from the mangled remains of Franklin Rex, one of the victims of the first fatal American railroad accident, Bordentown NJ 1833. John Bunyan.
Pilgrim's Progress - recovered from the mangled remains of Franklin Rex, one of the victims of the first fatal American railroad accident, Bordentown NJ 1833
Pilgrim's Progress - recovered from the mangled remains of Franklin Rex, one of the victims of the first fatal American railroad accident, Bordentown NJ 1833
Pilgrim's Progress - recovered from the mangled remains of Franklin Rex, one of the victims of the first fatal American railroad accident, Bordentown NJ 1833
Pilgrim's Progress - recovered from the mangled remains of Franklin Rex, one of the victims of the first fatal American railroad accident, Bordentown NJ 1833

Pilgrim's Progress - recovered from the mangled remains of Franklin Rex, one of the victims of the first fatal American railroad accident, Bordentown NJ 1833

Bridgeport: M. Sherman, 1827. Hardcover. Small 8vo (6.25 x 4 inches), original sprinkled calf with gilt spine, black spine label, good with some rubbing and wear, stains, foxing and tanning to contents. With note in old browned ink on title page: "This was in Uncle Franklins [Rex] pocket when he lost his life or met with the accident which cost his life at Bordenton NJ in 1833." The "Hightstown" rail accident occurred on the Camden and Amboy Railroad between Hightstown, New Jersey and Spotswood on 8 November 1833, just two months after horses were replaced by steam locomotives on the line. The train at the time of the accident was on its way from South Amboy to Bordentown at the rate of 35 mph, when an axel on one of the cars broke, which derailed and overturned that car. It is the earliest recorded train accident involving the death of passengers: one was killed outright and another died later of severe injuries; all 24 passengers in that particular railroad car suffered injuries. John Quincy Adams, riding in another car, escaped without injury: he described it as "the most dreadful catastrophe that ever did my eyes behold." Cornelius Vanderbilt was another passenger, and vowed never to ride in a train again (he eventually broke that vow and became a railroad magnate). This was sold at a Horst Auction in Ephrata some years ago where it was declared that some of the stains to the contents were from the blood of Mr. Rex's "mangled remains," but we have our doubts. Still, a moving momento from the first recorded railway accident that led to loss of life. Good. Item #H17864

Price: $200.00

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