Item #H27595 Letters to Mr. Archdeacon Travis, in answer to his Defence of the Three Heavenly Witnesses, I John V. 7. Richard Porson.
Letters to Mr. Archdeacon Travis, in answer to his Defence of the Three Heavenly Witnesses, I John V. 7
Letters to Mr. Archdeacon Travis, in answer to his Defence of the Three Heavenly Witnesses, I John V. 7
Letters to Mr. Archdeacon Travis, in answer to his Defence of the Three Heavenly Witnesses, I John V. 7
Letters to Mr. Archdeacon Travis, in answer to his Defence of the Three Heavenly Witnesses, I John V. 7
Letters to Mr. Archdeacon Travis, in answer to his Defence of the Three Heavenly Witnesses, I John V. 7
Letters to Mr. Archdeacon Travis, in answer to his Defence of the Three Heavenly Witnesses, I John V. 7

Letters to Mr. Archdeacon Travis, in answer to his Defence of the Three Heavenly Witnesses, I John V. 7

London: Printed for T. and J. Egerton, 1790. First Printing. Hardcover. 8vo, 9.25 x 6 inches, bound in modern calf-backed marbled boards with morocco spine label, very good, untrimmed tall copy with the uncommon half-title; (2) xxxix, 406 pp, light foxing, old ink inscription on verso of half-title quoting Gibbon's estimate of the work. This book is on a debated "Johannine Comma," an interpolated phrase in verses 5:7-8 of the First Epistle of John, and Porson's argument was contra the findings of Archdeacon Travis. Edward Gibbon's verdict on the book was that it was "the most acute and accurate piece of criticism since the days of Bentley." Gibbon had remarked in the third volume of "Decline and Fall" that the verse was an interpolation, which aroused Travis, the Archdeacon of Chester, to defend it. Porson agreed with Gibbon that the verse was spurious, but declined to defend it, as he explained, because "My natural indolence, my engagement in other studies, my contemport of the work, hindered me from troubling the public with my thoughts." But after an anonymous challenge to Porson was published in Gentleman's Magazine, Portson published seven letters to Travis in the same journal in 1788-89. When this book was published, it was on the unpopular side: the publisher lost money on the book; and one of Porson's early friends, Mrs Turner of Norwich, cut down a legacy she had left Porson to 30 Pounds on being told that he had written a book "against the Bible." The text in dispute, with the "comma" in brackets is: "For there are three that bear record [in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.] [And there are three that bear witness in earth], the Spirit, and the Water, and the Blood, and these three agree in one." It became a touchpoint for the Christian theological debate over the doctrine of the Trinity from the early church councils to the Catholic and Protestant disputes in the early modern period. Very good. Item #H27595

Price: $200.00

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