Item #H34784 The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness. Henry Herbert Goddard.
The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness
The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness
The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness
The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness
The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness
The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness
The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness
The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness

The Kallikak Family, a Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness

New York: Macmillan, 1913. Second Printing. Hardcover. 8vo, publisher's teal cloth gilt, very good, minor wear. 121 pp, illustrated. Early printings of this book are very rare. At the time of this listing, ours is the only pre-1930s copy on the market. An influential book in the history of eugenics and heredity. Supposedly an extended case study of Goddard’s for the inheritance of "feeble-mindedness", a general category referring to a variety of mental disabilities including intellectual disability, learning disabilities, and mental illness, the book is noted for factual inaccuracies that render its conclusions invalid. Goddard believed that a variety of mental traits were hereditary and that society should limit reproduction by people possessing these traits. The Kallikak Family was a tremendous success and went through multiple printings. It helped propel Goddard to the status of one of the nation's top experts in using psychology in policy, and along with the work of Charles B. Davenport and Madison Grant is considered one of the canonical works of early 20th-century American eugenics. Stephen Jay Gould advanced the view that Goddard—or someone working with him—had retouched the photographs used in his book in order to make the "bad" Kallikaks appear more menacing. In older editions of the books, Gould said, it has become clearly evident that someone had drawn in darker, "crazier" looking eyes and menacing faces on the children and adults in the pictures. Gould argues that photographic reproduction in books was still then a very new art, and that audiences would not have been as keenly aware of photographic retouching, even on such a crude level. The 14 photos were subsequently studied further to show the nature of the retouching and subsequent use to help make Goddard's points. (This information culled from wikipedia). Very good. Item #H34784

Price: $200.00

See all items in Biology
See all items by