Item #H35571 Henry Evans, an Exhibition Preview, 6 November 1966, 2 signed prints, Hunt Botanical Library Pittsburgh. Henry Evans.
Henry Evans, an Exhibition Preview, 6 November 1966, 2 signed prints, Hunt Botanical Library Pittsburgh
Henry Evans, an Exhibition Preview, 6 November 1966, 2 signed prints, Hunt Botanical Library Pittsburgh
Henry Evans, an Exhibition Preview, 6 November 1966, 2 signed prints, Hunt Botanical Library Pittsburgh
Henry Evans, an Exhibition Preview, 6 November 1966, 2 signed prints, Hunt Botanical Library Pittsburgh
Henry Evans, an Exhibition Preview, 6 November 1966, 2 signed prints, Hunt Botanical Library Pittsburgh

Henry Evans, an Exhibition Preview, 6 November 1966, 2 signed prints, Hunt Botanical Library Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh: Hunt Botanical Library, 1966. Wraps. 14.25 x 10.25 inches, wraps, a few pages, with mounted 3-color linoleum print of a calypso orchid, signed and numbered by Evans in pencil underneath (no. 16 of 211); the print sheet measures 9 x 5 inches. Front cover with some wear (small stain, tiny hole, light edgewear) but the print is fine. Laid in is another Evans print, "Mistletoe" no. 36/85 copies signed and dated (1975) in pencil above the image, a 2-color linocut. The sheet measures 12 x 9 inches and is fine, accompanied by a mat cut for it. The McCune Collection in Vallejo CA which has a large collection of Evans has this biography of him on their website: "Henry Evans was a man of many talents - a rare book dealer, a printer, and an artist. He owned the Porpoise Bookshop in San Francisco. He acquired his 1852 Washington Hand Press in 1949 and established the Peregrine Press by which he produced a number books he was interested in printing and the art work of Bay Area artists, such as Rick Barton, Mel Fowler, Mark Luca, Robert Quick, Leonard Basking, and Edward Hagedorn. Henry began to cut linoleum blocks so that he could learn to understand the best way to print the works of these artists. After learning to cut the linoleum, he started making his own botanical prints. Henry would draw his subjects directly from living plants and depicted life size. He would draw the design on the linoleum and cut the design in the block. He liked linoleum as a material because when properly warmed it would cut like butter due to the softness of the material, which would result in fluid and supple prints. Henry would destroy his linoleum blocks once his particular printing edition was completed. Marsha Evans, his wife, would do most of the printing. Marsha has indicated that it could take four days to make a particular print if the drawing contained four colors. Henry Evans began making his botanical prints in 1958 and during his career he drew more than 1400 subjects. In 1964, he decided to close the bookstore and to become solely “Henry Evans –Printmaker.” His botanical prints became very popular with the public and with museums and galleries. He has had more that 250 one-man shows and his works are in the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library, the Albertina in Vienna, the Clark Library at UCLA, the Gleeson Library, and the Bancroft Library, just to mention a few. Dr Donovan McCune was an early admirer and patron." Very good. Item #H35571

Price: $175.00

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