Item #H35843 1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician. Clara E. Reed Hengst, David Alfred Hengst.
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician
1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician

1889-1890 Diary of a Grand Tour trip to Europe by Wife of Prominent Pittsburgh Physician

Pittsburgh & Europe: 1889-1890. Hardcover. An uncommonly well written, observant and detailed journal. 7.75 x 4.75 inches, limp dark burgundy leather, very good, light rubbing and wear. Approximately 160 pages filled in by hand, documenting Clara's and David's trip to Europe commencing June 20, 1889 and finishing in mid-January, 1890. Clara (1856-1936) was the daughter of Dr. Joseph Reed who ran the Dixmont Hospital for the Insane. Her brother, James Hay Reed Sr. was one of the founders of Reed, Smith, Pittsburgh's most prominent law firm. The family was also related to other First Families in Pittsburgh such as the Fahnestocks and the Aikens. David Hengst (1849-1899) received his MD from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia in 1870 and became the house physician for Dixmont Insane Asylum outside of Pittsburgh (near Sewickley) in 1871, appointed by Dr. Joseph Reed. In 1877 he moved to Pittsburgh (eventually to 919 College Ave. in Shadyside) and became President of the Staff of Physicians and Nurses at Mercy Hospital, a position he held until his death in 1899. He was also on the staff of Eye and Ear Hospital, one of the founding doctors of the Children's Hospital in Pittsburgh and also did rounds at St. Francis. After the death of his wife Clara, he married the daughter of Dr. Reed of Dixmont Asylum in 1879. Hengst and his wife took the Steamship Gellert over in June, 1889 and were in London by the 1st of July. She writes of dinners, visits to the British Museum and Library, where she saw first editions of Milton, Shakespeare, old block books, and a map from 1292 AD., luncheons, teas, salons, buying clothing, walking along Charing Cross, etc., as well as attending medical clinics and lectures, the Dore Gallery, Westminster Abbey and Parliament, and looking at various paintings. Hengst stayed for over a month in London, and attended a "Jewish Wedding" at the West London Synagogue, going to see the Queen arrive at Buckingham Palace from Victoria Station: "After waiting patiently we were rewarded by having a splendid view of her as she sat on one side of the carriage -- and bowed with a very serious countenance in our direction. We thought ourselves very fortunate, I must confess I was somewhat disappointed. Her face did not have that refinement [?] I expected but was very large and coarse. She was accompanied by Prince Henry and Princess Beatrice & someone else; none of whom I saw as I was too busy looking at the Queen. Hardly a sound was heard, not a cheer or a cry. The outriders looked very elegant in their scarlet suits, and the Guard in their bright armor." Hengst also attended the Royal Wedding Procession on July 27; Princess Louise Victoria Alexandra Dagmar, eldest daughter of the Prince of Wales, was married at noon that day to Alexander William George, Earl of Fife. Hengst's devotion to museum-going and examining various exhibitions of paintings, sculpture, antiquities, etc., is also worth mentioning, as she had a keen eye and a good sense of aesthetics. There are multiple dinners, garden parties, sermons, lectures, all described. Hengst then spent a few days in Leeds and on to Edinburgh, where she describes museums, going to services at St. Giles and remarks that it was there that Jenny Geddes famously threw a stool at the minister for using the 1637 Church of Scotland version of the Book of Common Prayer, which sparked a riot, which sparked the English Civil War. Then to Glasgow, and the next stop after that was Paris, which they reached on August 20th, 1889. Mrs. Hengst was a fairly religious woman and liked to go to a range of services, including in Paris, where she was critical of the sound levels. She liked the Eiffel Tower very much and they also found a museum that had a display of old surgical instruments that fascinated "the Dr." as she called her husband; the Exposition Universelle was in full swing and the Hengsts spent a significant amount of time at it, including ogling the Imperial Diamond, at that time the largest diamond in the world (Clara's drawing of it, a bit like a Ferris Wheel, suggests its dimensions were about the size of a quarter). By early September they had left for Cologne, where Mrs. Hengst admired the cathedral and devotes at least two pages to describing it. From there to Wiesbaden, Heidelberg, with Mrs. Hengst remarking that the accommodations by train were very comfortable and the sights through the windows very lovely with "castle after castle," and the same was true of the route to Zurich, where they only spent a day or two before going to Interlaken; there they had a horseback tour of the lower Alps and its views and glaciers. "We were set down by our guides, and with another guide, walked a little distance over the mountain toward the glaciers. Where we stood, was beneath at least 7000 feet of ice we then went into the ice grotto, made of tunnels, cut into the solid ice, and when we reached the last tunnel, we were 150 feet from the entrance and 150 feet under the surface, the color of the ice, a beautiful blue (electric), made everyone look a ghastly color, just like death. We then retraced our steps, and on the return trip through the valley overshadowed by the towering mountains, we were glad of our wrap for, as the sun went down behind the mountains, it was very cool – although it was very warm in the sun at the glacier. We have a magnificent view of the Jungfrau from our hotel, where it is not covered and hidden by clouds." From there to Lucerne and then Lake Como, where "We have had the most magnificent scenery today that we ever saw." She spent some time exploring Como and extolling its beauty. "After breakfasting at the little hotel, Como, we took the boat at 9 o'clock for Bellagio, and had a charming ride on the beautiful lake Como, which is nestled among the mountains, they rise from its shores on every side, and are dotted with quaint villages and terraces and villas, which make a charming landscape, the gay colors of the houses the pink and my favorite color lavender also, and blue and yellow, with shutters of strongly contrasting color, giving at a distance, just the dash of color to the landscape to make it unique and so pretty." After that they spent some time in Milan and thence to Venice where Hengst devotes some pages to artworks she saw there, mosaics and glass. By October they were in Vienna, in time for the Emperor's birthday, "and just after I had my breakfast, the soldiers marched by the corner church, just near us, and which I can see from the cozy bay window, where I am now writing." They also saw Verdi's opera "Un ballo in maschera" (The Masked Ball), "with a very beautiful and little Ballet introduced in the Masquerade scene, opera over at 9 and followed by a farce which rather spoiled the effect of the music." They received a newspaper from home, and read that Hengst had been elected to the staff of the new Children's Hospital, "a positition which pleases him very much." She also visited a historical museum where she saw Schubert's and Mozart's pianos. One day they went to the Schonbrunn Palace and were fortunate in being able to see the apartments of the emperor who was absent. State dining and ceremonial colors were very beautiful, white and gold decorations, and beautiful floors, with the walls of the salons showing portraits and pictures of Austrian royalty. She sampled Vienna's famous chocolates in a cafe and spent much time at the Belvedere, and one day "finally" got to see the Crown Jewels and was dazzled by the emeralds and diamonds. She describes going to dinner with a Dr. Henning (?) of Boston and gives a long description of how the table was set. "The table was laid with two forks above the side of a plate, knife and soup spoon on right side, dessert spoon and fork also above, napkin and bread beside, laid on table, this plate removed with soup, which was bouillon and little dice (?), etc., served in it, next, fish boiled, served head and all and passed as were all of the dishes, just as that tableside to each person, next was an entrée of some sort of a pudding, which may have been macaroni. Next the main course, fillet, entrecote, mushrooms over it, gravy and vegetables, then came birds carved into quarters and with them as usual the salad, then pudding, followed by ice cream in beautiful forms after which crumbs and remnants of bread, etc. were taken up with fruit and candy, with coffee in the salon." They seemed to have spent about as much time in Vienna as they did in London, and in later December were still there, seeing another opera, "La Dame Blanche" by Boieldieu. By December 23 they were in Prague and began by visiting some of the old churches, but what was of most interest to her was the old Council Hall, the site of a scene in about 1620 when some of the old council, who were intolerant and obnoxious, were thrown out of the high windows, 75 ft. above the ground, but landed on a pile of manure and were unhurt; they then started a "rumpus" which led to the 30 Years' War (at least in her reading). From there they went to Dresden, where Clara has much to say regarding its history and artworks, and from there to Berlin. On New Year's Day they decided to go to Charlottenburg but found it closed, and so began walking "And we're just in time to meet the Kaiser and Kaiserine, Crown prince and princess, in all their glory – returning from a short drive – we were quite near – and as there were comparatively few people about – saw them very distinctly, and had a good share of their view in our direction -- the royal carriages are gorgeous!" A day or two later they encountered the Kaiser again, "No one else was quite so close at the time – and as Dr. raised his hat – so did the Kaiser, as he rode along in a low, open carriage with Adjutant Flugel beside him." By January 7, 1890 they were in Bremen and preparing to depart for America. Mrs. Hengst also kept some notes, recorded in some of the latter pages of this book, of expenses and purchases, including the cost of tourist photographs of various places, the purchase of silver souvenir spoons in each of the cities and other acquisitions such as Staffordshire, saxon ware, Dresden china and Meissen, lists of hotels in Berlin, Dresden, Switzerland, etc., including names of proprietors, guides, etc., addresses of people and businesses in London, Lucerne, Paris and Wiesbaden, etc. Very good. Item #H35843

Price: $400.00

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