Item #H36038 Go Go (Manikin Number Two, 1923). William Carlos Williams.
Go Go (Manikin Number Two, 1923)
Go Go (Manikin Number Two, 1923)
Go Go (Manikin Number Two, 1923)
Go Go (Manikin Number Two, 1923)
Go Go (Manikin Number Two, 1923)

Go Go (Manikin Number Two, 1923)

New York: Monroe Wheeler, 1923. First Printing. Wraps. One of 150 copies printed. 7 x 5 inches, softcover with blue cord tie, stiff gray-tan wraps decorated and lettered in blue, very good, minor wear and tanning to covers, bookplate of the University of Chicago library on verso of front cover, "From the collection of Hi Simons, 1896-1945" with pencil signature on flyleaf of Helen & Hi Simons, 5-12-37. Some of the poems have very light and erasable tiny marks next to title: either a check mark, an exclamation point or a question mark. This collection is the first in America to include "The Red Wheelbarrow" -- considered by many to be one of the greatest and most iconic poems to emerge from the American modernist-imagist movement. Go Go reproduces all the poems that came out in "Spring and All" with the addition of "The Hermaphroditic Telephones." An excellent association copy. The University of Chicago gives the following biographical information about Hi Simons: "H. A. (Hi) Simons (1986-1945) had an extended career as a poet and patron of the arts. The first letter in this collection (April 5, 1915) is to Margaret Anderson, editor of the Little Review, to which Simons was submitting some verse. Just a few months later, when he read that the Little Review was in financial difficulties and about to fold, Simons offered Anderson the bulk of his meager savings to help rescue the magazine. This gift of $75 was instrumental in saving the Little Review, and Hi Simons was accepted as a friend into the circle of Chicago poets. Within a few years, Simons turned publisher himself. With the assistance of Steen Hinrichsen, Mitchell Dawson, Adam Lunoe and others, Simons started a Chicago literary journal called Musterbooks. Only two issues appeared, in 1921 and 1922. The name of the publication was chosen from a quote from John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi. Each MUSTERBOOK was to be devoted to a single, theme or artist. The first issue contained reproductions of the German expressionist artist, George Grosz. The second issue was a collection of poems by Yvor Winters, cumulatively entitled, The Magpie's Shadow, to which the entire MUSTERBOOK II (as it was designated) was devoted. Further issues of MUSTERBOOK were announced but never reached the press. In 1937 Simons began an extended correspondence with Wallace Stevens, which lasted until Simons' death in 1945. In contemplation of a book about a poet, Simons queried Stevens about his poetry, to which Stevens responded with detailed analyses of his work. Although Simons published a number of articles on Stevens he did not finish the book before his death. Hi Simons was professionally active in literary circles throughout his later life. At various times he was president of Year Book Publishers, president of the Society of Contemporary American Art, member of the foreign trade committee of the Book Publishers Association, and a lecturer at the Art Institute of Chicago." Wallace A8. Very good. Item #H36038

Price: $475.00

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