Proceedings of the Meeting held at the Inauguration of Rutgers Female College, April 25, 1867, plus Catalogue of Rutgers Female College for the year 1867-1868. NYC Rutgers Female College.
Proceedings of the Meeting held at the Inauguration of Rutgers Female College, April 25, 1867, plus Catalogue of Rutgers Female College for the year 1867-1868
Proceedings of the Meeting held at the Inauguration of Rutgers Female College, April 25, 1867, plus Catalogue of Rutgers Female College for the year 1867-1868
Proceedings of the Meeting held at the Inauguration of Rutgers Female College, April 25, 1867, plus Catalogue of Rutgers Female College for the year 1867-1868

Proceedings of the Meeting held at the Inauguration of Rutgers Female College, April 25, 1867, plus Catalogue of Rutgers Female College for the year 1867-1868

New York: Agathynian Press, 1867. The copy of Jacob Tallman, the man most responsible for the downfall of Rutgers Female College. 2 volumes: the first in green cloth gilt (with Tallman's name in gilt on cover), 54 (6) pp, with frontispiece and partly colored plan of the future campus on last page, vey good. The catalog is in wraps, good with some chipping to covers and outermost leaves, 35 pp with same frontispiece as in the cloth book. The Rutgers Female Seminary was founded in 1839 and was the first chartered all-girls school in NYC. In 1867 it became a college, thanks to a new state charter, offering bachelor's degrees, the first all-female college in NYC. But over the next years, the financial malfeasance of two of its trustees ultimately caused the institution's demise. Jacob Tallman, a builder and real estate speculator, joined the trustees in 1871. Tallman was alleged soon afterward to have conspired with both new president Henry N. Pierce and Pierce’s brother to mortgage the College’s elegant Fifth Avenue property, located across from what would be the New York Public Library, which he then snatched up for much less than its real value. In this way Tallman became the College’s landlord, charging its board a hefty rent—which it couldn’t always pay. In 1882 Tallman evicted the College from its longstanding home, and then resold it for $180,000. He pocketed all the proceeds as personal profit. The trustees later cried foul, and sued Tallman in a case that by 1891 had gone all the way to the NY Supreme Court. In 1893 the court decided in favor of Tallman and against the trustees, taking a dim view of their lack of due diligence. (Information on Tallman from a Rutgers Classics Department blog from July 2018). Very Good. Item #H9274

Price: $175.00

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